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Mission Control Game Images
 
Hurricane on Earth
Hurricane Isabel, taken by instruments on two Earth-orbiting NASA satellites: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument on Aqua and the SeaWinds instrument on QuikScat.
 
Jupiter's Great Red Spot
Jupiter's Great Red Spot, seen by the Galileo spacecraft.
 
Saturn anti-hurricanes
Saturn's anti-hurricanes, or hurricanes that spiral backwards compared to ones on Earth. The image was taken by the Cassini spacecraft.
 
Dust devil on Mars
This image of dust devils was taken by the Spirit rover on Mars. The dust devil is not a hurricane.
 
Dust storm on Mars
Dust storms (top view), seen by Mars Global Surveyor. When viewed from space, these may look like hurricanes we see on Earth (bottom view), but they're just regional dust storms.
 
Neptune's moon Triton
This image of Neptune's moon Triton, taken by Voyager 2 in 1989, shows dark plumes but no volcanoes. Voyager is no longer taking pictures.
 
Sun
This is a picture of our sun, the closest star to us. The picture was taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, a joint project between the European Space Agency and NASA.
 
Silver Dollar galaxy
This image of the Silver Dollar galaxy, taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, shows stars that are younger than our sun.
 
Vega, a star
This is an infrared view of the star Vega, from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Although the star is twice the size of our sun and much hotter, it will not live as long.
 
Sun, from Mars
This is how the rovers on Mars see our star, the sun.
 
Comet Tempel 1
Deep Impact is 'asleep' and can't take pictures right now. Earlier in its mission, it took this picture of comet Tempel 1. The comet may look like a star but it is made of ice and dust and travels around our sun.
 
Drawing of Ulysses
The Ulysses spacecraft, whose orbit takes it over the poles of the sun, has no camera. It collects data about particles and magnetism in space.
 
Grand Canyon
Grand Canyon, Arizona. This view simulates the Grand Canyon's true colors. It was created from JPL's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer on NASA's Terra satellite.
 
Canyon on Venus
This radar image of a canyon on Venus was taken by the Magellan spacecraft. These canyons are not as deep as Earth's Grand Canyon.
 
Canyon on Mars
Valles Marineris, or Mariner Valley, is four times deeper than the Grand Canyon on Earth. The image was taken by Mars Odyssey
 
Saturn's moon Phoebe
This picture of Saturn's moon Phoebe, taken by the Cassini spacecraft, shows deep craters but no canyons.
 
Comet Wild 2
The Stardust spacecraft is 'sleeping' right now. During its mission, it took this picture of comet Wild 2. Although the comet has canyon-like features, they are not as deep as the Grand Canyon.
 
Crater on Mars
This picture of Endurance Crater was taken by the Opportunity rover on Mars. It is only 120 meters (about 400 feet) across and 20 meters (66 feet) deep, much smaller than Earth's Grand Canyon.
 
Volcano on Earth
The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo is about 3 kilometers (2 miles) high. This view combines data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer.
 
Volcano on Venus
This radar image of Maat Mons, a volcano on Venus, was taken by the Magellan Spacecraft.
 
Volcano on Mars
Olympus Mons, a volcano on Mars, is twice as high as Mt. Everest and as big as the state of Arizona. This picture was taken by Mars Global Surveyor.
 
Geyser on Saturn's moon Enceladus
This colorized picture of Saturn's moon Enceladus, taken by the Cassini spacecraft, shows a plume of water vapor erupting from a geyser, not a volcano.
 
Impact on Comet
Deep Impact is not taking pictures right now. Earlier in its mission it took this image of comet Tempel 1, just after the comet was intentionally hit by the spacecraft's impactor. The comet is spraying dust and ice but it's not a volcano.
 
Neptune's moon Triton
This image of Neptune's moon Triton, taken by Voyager 2 in 1989, shows dark plumes but no volcanoes. Voyager is no longer taking pictures.
 
Arctic region on Earth
Devon Island in the Arctic is covered with ice. This image was taken by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer on NASA's Terra satellite.
 
Cliffs on Jupiter's moon Europa
This picture of ice cliffs on Jupiter's moon Europa was taken by the Galileo spacecraft.
 
Mars's North Pole
This 3-D view of the North Pole of Mars shows large ice fields. The picture was taken by the Mars Global Surveyor.
 
Saturn's moon Enceladus
Saturn's icy moon, Enceladus, has no polar cap. This picture was taken by the Cassini spacecraft.
 
Comet Tempel 1
Deep Impact is "asleep" right now and can't take pictures. In July 2005, the spacecraft took this image of comet Tempel 1, which has ice but no polar caps.
 
Neptune's moon Triton
In 1989, Voyager 2 took this picture that shows the icy surface of the moon Triton, with Neptune in the background. The moon's polar caps are made of nitrogen, not ice. Voyager is no longer taking pictures.
 
Earth's moon
This view from space shows our moon. It was taken by JPL's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope.
 
Close-up of Earth's moon
This is the first picture of our moon taken by a U.S. spacecraft. Ranger 7 took this image in 1964.
 
Saturn's moon Mimas
Saturn's moon Mimas has many craters, just like our moon. The Cassini spacecraft took this picture.
 
Drawing of Ulysses
The Ulysses spacecraft, whose orbit takes it over the poles of the sun, has no camera. It collects data about particles and magnetism in space.
 
Mars' moon Phobos
This picture of Phobos, a moon of Mars, was taken by the Spirit rover and the European Space Agency's Mars Express satellite. Phobos isn't as cratered or as round as our moon.
 
Saturn's moon Titan
This picture of Saturn's moon Titan was taken by the European Space Agency's Huygens probe. Huygens floated by parachute through Titan's atmosphere and took pictures.
 

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